BURNING PCBS WILL SET NATIONAL PRECEDENT

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SUMMARY: Burning PCBs Will Set National Precedent

FACT SHEET: Burning PCBs Will Set Dangerous Precedent

FACT SHEET: Alternatives to Open Burning

NEW JERSEY BURNS LEAVE TOXIC LEGACY

NATIONAL COALITION OPPOSES MILITARY EXEMPTION

PHOTOGRAPHS OF PCB PAINT AT BADGER

MORE GROUPS JOIN OPPOSITION TO BURNING

Open burning at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant in Nebraska, 2002.

Open burning at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, August 10, 2002

Photographs taken in February 2004 of open burning at Indiana Army Ammunition Plant. A permit allows the Army to burn 64 buildings at the former Indiana Army Ammunition Plant before March 16. According to local news accounts, the Army will burn a total of 327 buildings over the next five years. Photos by the Courier-Journal.

Open burning at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, August 10, 2002

February 2004

Burning PCBs Will Set National Precedent

It took weeks of phone calls, but CSWAB has finally learned one of the reasons why we haven’t seen any burning at Badger Army Ammunition Plant.  The Army is seeking an exemption to a federal law that prohibits open burning of wastes containing more than 50 parts per million of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). PCB concentrations in paint in certain buildings at Badger have been detected as high as 22,000 parts per million – more than 400 times the permissible limit set by the EPA.

No other military installation in the nation has been allowed to open burn PCB-contaminated wastes exceeding the federal limit of 50 parts per million (ppm).  If approved by EPA, the exemption will open the door for open burning of extraordinary levels of PCBs at Badger and other U.S. military bases here and abroad.

EPA set the 50 ppm limit for good reason.  Open burning results in the uncontrolled release of PCBs, dioxins, and other products of combustion to the environment including polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). These compounds are probable human carcinogens and their toxicity can be up to 100 times higher than the toxicity of some PCBs.

According to the Wisconsin Division of Health, the developing fetus, infants, and children are the population groups most vulnerable to PCB exposure.  While an adult may experience symptoms such as rash or acne as a result of PCB exposure, exposure of fetuses and children may impede the very development of their brains, reproductive, immune, and endocrine systems.

Officials at EPA headquarters in Washington, DC said that while open burning of old buildings has occurred at a number of other bases including the Joliet Arsenal in Illinois, Indiana Army Ammunition Plant, and the Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant in Ohio, none of these facilities burned any materials with PCBs concentrations greater than 50 ppm.  In fact, the EPA is not aware of any facility in the nation that has been allowed to open burn wastes containing PCB levels above 50, much less 22,000 ppm.

EPA readily acknowledges that the Army’s request is significant at a national level because if approved at Badger, it is very likely that the Agency will see many more similar proposals, both civilian and military, for open burning extraordinary levels of PCBs.

The only good news is that EPA officials are still at the information-gathering stage and that the Army has not submitted a formal application for the exemption.

Our goal is to stop the exemption from being granted and prevent the uncontrolled release of PCBs, dioxins, and other toxins to the environment.  At least 100 buildings, and perhaps many more, are targeted for open burning at Badger. The burning, once given this final approval, will continue for approximately 10 years.

It will take all of us working together to stop a proposal that will impact the health of so many and for generations to come.  For more information, including a more detailed fact sheet, contact CSWAB at (608) 643-3124 or visit our website at www.cswab.org.

Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger
FACT SHEET
Burning PCBs Will Set Dangerous Precedent

Badger Army Ammunition Plant is seeking an exemption to a federal law that prohibits open burning of waste materials containing more than 50 parts per million of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).  PCB concentrations in paint in certain buildings at Badger have been detected as high as 22,000 parts per million – more than 400 times the permissible limit set by the EPA.  No other military installation in the nation that has been allowed to open burn PCB-contaminated wastes exceeding the federal limit of 50 parts per million.  If approved by EPA, the exemption will open the door for open burning of extraordinary levels of PCBs at Badger and other U.S. military bases here and abroad.

What are PCBs and why are they in some paints?

PCBs were first manufactured in 1929.  Due to their carcinogenic characteristics, the manufacture of PCBs was banned in 1978.  There are 209 possible compounds or congeners of PCBs.  Paint manufacturers used around 5 to 12 percent PCBs in paints as a plasticizer.  PCBs were used primarily in specialty paints intended for industrial or military applications.

What happens when you burn PCBs?

Open burning results in the uncontrolled release of PCBs, dioxins, and other products of combustion to the environment.  Both PCBs and dioxins are persistent in the environment and do not readily degrade.  PCBs can travel long distances in the air (>10 miles) and deposit in areas far from where they were released.  PCBs are taken up by small organisms, fish, and marine mammals, reaching levels that may be many thousands of times higher than the water itself.

Open burning of PCBs results in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). These compounds are probable human carcinogens and their toxicity can be up to 100 times higher than the toxicity of some PCBs.

About 90% of exposure to dioxins and furans is from eating contaminated food.   Dioxins and furans typically stay and build up in the fatty tissues of animals. This means that eating beef, pork, poultry, fish, and dairy products can be a source of exposure.

What are some of the potential health affects?

Human exposure to PCBs is a concern because of the wide range of adverse health effects including skin irritation, reproductive and developmental effects, immunologic effects, liver damage, and cancer.  Some PCBs can mimic or block the action of hormones from the thyroid and other endocrine glands, affecting normal growth and development.

The developing fetus, infants, and children are the population groups most vulnerable to exposure.  Exposure may impede the development of their brains, reproductive, immune, and endocrine systems.  PCBs can be passed to the human fetus through the placenta and to the infant through breast feeding.

What are the risks specific to Badger?

The exact level of risk is still unknown.  The EPA is currently gathering information from the Army and other sources to help answer this question.

How can the Army remove the PCBs and still protect human health?

Not burn.  As this fact sheet has explained, thermal treatment not only causes an uncontrolled release of PCBs to the air and surrounding soils, it creates toxic by-products that can 100 times more toxic than the PCBs themselves.

Examples of non-thermal technologies include chemical deactivation, biological deactivation, fluid penetration, ozone treatment, and robotic removal.

Again, PCB contamination exceeding 50 ppm is expected to be a concern in a relatively small number of buildings, making alternative technologies, which are not easily implemented on a large scale, feasible.

What is the current status of Badger’s proposal?

Under current law, “any person” wishing to dispose of PCB-contaminated wastes by a means OTHER than landfilling, incineration, high efficiency boiler, or other regulated disposal process, must apply in writing to the EPA Regional Administrator.

EPA says they are still at the information-gathering stage.  The Army has not submitted a formal application for the exemption.  EPA will issue a written approval if it finds that the method will “not pose an unreasonable risk of injury to health or the environment.”

At least 100 buildings, and perhaps many more, are targeted for open burning.  The burning, once given this final approval, will continue for approximately 10 years.

Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger
FACT SHEET
Alternatives to Open Burning

Risks Posed by Open Burning
(Source: U.S. Army Industrial Operations Command, July 1996)

  • Potential risks to workers posed by the inhalation of vapors and fugitive particulates during the burning of the building;
  • The potential risks to personnel and others who may be exposed to air borne vapors and dust generated during burning;
  • The potential risks to environmental receptors (natural areas) that may be exposed to air borne vapors and dust generated during burning;
  • The potential risks to both human receptors and environmental receptors from the deposition of air borne particulates; these deposited materials could affect both soil and surface water bodies in the area surrounding the burn site.
  • If the building contains ACM (Asbestos Containing Materials), the debris will contain potential unconfined friable asbestos which may become air born during debris removal following the burn.
  • The potential for the fire to burn out of control and ignite adjacent structures.

Alternatives Technologies
(Sources: U.S. Army Environmental Center and U.S. Industrial Operations Command)

  • Biological Deactivation or explosives bioremediation involves the addition of bacteria which have been selected from naturally occurring populations for their abilities to metabolize explosives contaminants. This approach is very similar to the bioremediation being used in other areas of Badger to clean up explosive waste in soils and groundwater.  The Army reports one company has developed a technology that utilizes a surfactant produced by a specialized group of microorganisms that has the capability to decontaminate buildings, structures and other materials to an “acceptable safe-level.”  This system, the military reports, is “non-polluting and should cause no significant damage to building materials or equipment.”
  • Mechanical Demolition/Disposal can be used to demolish buildings that are contaminated with energetics by using heavy equipment that has been modified to protect workers from the effects of potential detonations.  Sensitive building demolition using heavy equipment has been performed at Piccatiny Arsenal in New Jersey, the U.S. Industrial Command reports. “The operator compartment and other areas of the vehicle that are susceptible to damage are covered with thick lexan plastic and steel plate to provide protection against explosions.  Additional protection is provided by equipping the machinery with extended arms.  Prior to beginning demolition, the entire structure is wetted to temporarily deactivate explosive contaminants and to provide dust suppression.”
  • Demolition by explosives is “routinely used to demolish buildings.”  Debris is removed by armored heavy equipment with extended mechanical arms and debris is often landfilled.
  • Chemical Deactivation involves several steps including wetting, sodium hydroxide and possible organic solvent addition, solvent recirculation, solvent collection and disposal and neutralization. “To control the process and minimize potential for releases of chemicals to the environment, temporary containment measures are used to prevent water and chemicals from draining to surrounding soils or nearby waterways.  All drains from the building are plugged and a sump or low point (either existing or installed) is used to collect excess liquids.  A water/chemical distribution system with spray nozzles is installed inside and outside the building but within the enclosure,” the Army said.
  • Hydroblasting is a mechanical removal method that uses a 500-20,000 psi water jet to remove contaminated surfaces.  According to the U.S. Army Environmental Center, “explosives-contaminated materials are routinely decontaminated to above 99.9% levels using methods such as pressure washing or stream cleaning.”
  • Enclosed burning employs a pre-manufactured portable enclosure that can be placed over the building to be burned.  Emissions are ducted to an incinerator/afterburner system intended to capture particulates and combustion products.
  • Hot Gas Decontamination provides a rapid, cost effective method to achieve required removal efficiencies, according to military sources.  The United States Army Environmental Center reports that it has sponsored demonstrations that show that 99.9999% decontamination of structural components is possible using heated gas to thermally decompose or volatilize explosives or chemical agents, with destruction of off-gases in a thermal oxidizer. The hot-gas process was effective for treatment of items contaminated with explosives, USAEC reported.
  • Inerting of Explosives is effective in desensitizing explosives to allow “safe access to sensitive buildings and equipment”, the Army reports. “Wetting with water, will desensitize most explosives including NC (nitrocellulose).  Agents which desensitize and inactivate can be mixed and then applied in the same treatment.”  While this approach is not considered a decontamination technique, it is a useful strategy to allow safe access for workers, the military said.

This list is presented to illustrate the range of potential alternatives to open burning and does not necessarily imply an endorsement of a specific technology by CSWAB.

Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger (CSWAB) is working to mobilize and empower rural communities near Wisconsin’s Badger Army Ammunition Plant in support of a sustainable future that will protect and restore the integrity of soil, water, air, and biological diversity.

For more information contact: CSWAB, E12629 Weigand’s Bay South, Merrimac, WI  53561 (608) 643-3124 or http://74.52.144.210/~cswab/safewater

Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger
FACT SHEET
New Jersey Burns Leave Toxic Legacy


The Picatinny Arsenal is a 6,500-acre military installation located in the northwest corner of New Jersey.  First established in 1880, Picatinny was the only facility in the United States producing ammunition larger than 50 caliber during World War II.  Today, its primary mission is research, engineering, and production support for weapon systems including mortars, tanks, and artillery.

Between 1981 and 1989, approximately 97 buildings at the Picatinny Arsenal were demolished after being decontaminated by fire.  The buildings had been used for a variety of purposes ranging from munitions production to inert storage.  Prior to open burning, asbestos-containing building materials were removed.

Several years later, between May 1995 and November 1996, the Department of Defense conducted an environmental investigation of three former burn sites.  Soil samples were tested for a wide range of contaminants including volatiles, semi-volatiles, explosives, pesticides, PCBs, asbestos, inorganics, anions, fuel-related contaminants, and dioxins/furans.

Dioxins, a group of persistent toxins that cause birth defects and cancer, were detected in surface soils at all three burn areas above levels of concern cited in the military’s study.  According to the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), total dioxin concentrations should not exceed 1 part per billion (ppb) to be protective of human health.  Total dioxin levels at one burn site were more than 6 ppb.

The military’s investigation found that dioxins and furans were “most likely” caused by the burning activities and not historical activities at the base. (Source: Phase II Remedial Investigation Report, Picatinny Arsenal.)

Low levels of furans were detected in 9 out of 9 surface soil samples.  Concentrations of 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzofuran at one burn site were nearly three times the level of concern.  According to federal health officials, chronic exposure to this contaminant may cause carcinogenic, genetic, reproductive, and developmental effects.

Concentrations of other surface soil contaminants, including PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), antimony, arsenic, and lead, exceeded federal thresholds for cancer risk or other human health standards.  Lead can affect almost every organ and system in your body. The most sensitive is the central nervous system, particularly in children.  Lead also damages kidneys and the reproductive system.

Decontamination of buildings by fire has occurred or is proposed at military sites across the nation including Joliet Arsenal in Illinois, Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant in Ohio, Indiana Army Ammunition Plant, and Wisconsin’s Badger Army Ammunition Plant.

CSWAB
Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger

E12629 Weigand’s Bay South – Merrimac, WI  53561
Phone (608) 643-3124 – Fax (608) 643-0005
Email: info@cswab.org – Website: www.cswab.org

March 22, 2004
PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release

National Coalition Opposes
Exemption for Military to Burn PCBs

A national coalition of 67 organizations from all over the country, including groups from Alaska, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Puerto Rico, California, and Wisconsin, are formally opposing open burning of PCBs at Badger Army Ammunition Plant – a proposal that would set a national precedent and open the door for similar exemptions at military and civilian facilities across the U.S.

In a letter sent today to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the groups are opposing a move by the U.S. Army to seek an exemption to a federal EPA law that prohibits open burning of wastes containing more than 50 parts per million of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).  PCB concentrations in paint in certain buildings at Badger have been detected as high as 22,000 parts per million – more than 400 times the permissible limit set by the EPA.

“The mere thought of open burning PCB contaminated materials is preposterous,” said Craig Williams, Director of the Chemical Weapons Working Group.  “EPA regulates burning such materials by requiring 99.9999% destruction, even in incinerators.  In the Badger proposal there is zero control; zero monitoring; and, zero ability to determine the quantity of this probable human carcinogen released into the environment.”

Open burning results in the uncontrolled release of PCBs, dioxins, and other products of combustion to the environment including polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs).  These compounds are probable human carcinogens and their toxicity can be up to 100 times higher than the toxicity of some PCBs.

“Decades of scientific research have shown that PCBs, dioxins and furans are major public health threats.  Concentrations in the environment, and in the food chain, are already too high,” warned Dr. Bruce Barrett with Madison Physicians for Social Responsibility.  “Open burning of paints, plastics, and PCB-contaminated materials like that proposed at Badger would be foolhardy, and dangerous.  Children, pregnant women, and their fetuses are especially vulnerable.  Birth defects and developmental delays could easily result.”

Human exposure to these contaminants is a concern because of the wide range of adverse health effects including skin irritation, reproductive and developmental effects, immunologic effects, liver damage, and cancer.  Some PCBs can mimic or block the action of hormones from the thyroid and other endocrine glands, affecting normal growth and development.

“PCBs and Dioxins are potent xenoestrogens that are biologically active at extremely low doses.  They are very persistent and bioaccumulate in wildlife and people,” said Dr. Warren Porter, Professor of Zoology and Environmental Toxicology at the University of Wisconsin.  “Xenoestrogens have been linked to increases in breast cancer, heart problems in developing embryos, reduced sperm counts, neurotoxic, immune, and hormonal effects.”

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, over 96 percent of our dioxin exposure comes from eating meat, dairy products, eggs and fish.  Dioxin particles from incinerators and industrial plants travel far and wide, eventually settling and contaminating our soil, water, and plants.  Because it does not break down easily, over time it accumulates in the environment and is eaten and stored in the fat tissue of animals and then humans.

“Reckless burning of toxic waste is a potential disaster for farmers and a ticking timebomb for consumers,” noted John E. Peck, Executive Director of Family Farm Defenders.  “Who knows just how much PCBs, dioxin, furans and other pollutants will be released from Badger Ammunition, blow downwind onto pastures, crops, and animals, and end up on people’s dinner plates?  Public trust in our state’s dairy sector is already bad enough due to rBGH, antibiotic residues, factory farms, and now Mad Cow.  Why add insult to injury with more dangerous contamination of our food supply?”

“Emissions also threaten the ecological and cultural health of the Sauk Prairie which stretches across 14,000 acres from the Wisconsin River to the Baraboo Range and nearby Devil’s Lake State Park,” said Laura Olah, Executive Director of Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger. “The Badger property is home to nearly 600 species of plants, butterflies, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, aquatic species, and birds.  Grassland birds, in particular, have been able to thrive at the plant, making it one of the most critical habitat areas in the Midwest for this rapidly declining group.”

According to the coalition’s letter, signed by 128 individuals and organizations, non-thermal technologies, including biological deactivation, mechanical demolition and disposal, hydroblasting, inerting, and many others, have been successfully implemented at military bases across the country.

“There are other means to solve this problem.  The Army must recognize that open burning is not a solution, it is merely transfer of the problem,” emphasized Laura Hunter, Campaign Director with California’s Environmental Health Coalition.  “Here in San Diego we worked with the Navy to avoid the burning of PCB wastes and sought alternative technologies.  We encourage the Army to do the same in Badger.”

In addition to Wisconsin, decontamination of buildings by fire has occurred or is proposed at military sites across the nation including Joliet Arsenal in Illinois, Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant in Ohio, and Indiana Army Ammunition Plant.   Even though PCB concentrations at these other facilities did not exceed the federal 50 ppm threshold, officials in some states have issued public health advisories prior to each burn.

“The Army has recently begun to open burn some of the abandoned buildings at the closed Army Ammunition Plant near Charlestown, Indiana.  After some complaints, the Department of Environmental Management is now issuing health notices prior to each burn,” said Richard Hill, President of Save the Valley.  “These notices advise local residents that there is ‘potential for adverse health effects associated with smoke from the fire’ and that concerned people should stay indoors during the burn.”

“Open burning and detonation by the US Navy for decades on Vieques put into our environment a long list of dangerous military toxics we believe are responsible for the health crisis our people suffer,” said Robert Rabin with Committee for the Rescue and Development of Vieques. “Vieques has the highest cancer case rate in all of Puerto Rico; there are no other significant sources of contamination.   Any further open burning on the Eastern end of Vieques – where the Navy bombed from jets, ships, bazookas, tanks, mortars and experimented with new weapons systems –  would be considered by our community a serious attack on the health of our island and families.”

“We strongly oppose open burning of PCBs at Badger Army Ammunition Plant because it would set a national precedent and open the door for similar exemptions at military and civilian facilities across the U.S., like Vieques,” Rabin added.

PCBs were first manufactured in 1929.  Due to their carcinogenic characteristics, the manufacture of PCBs was banned in 1978.  There are 209 possible compounds or congeners of PCBs.  Paint manufacturers used around 5 to 12 percent PCBs in paints as a plasticizer.  PCBs were used primarily in specialty paints intended for industrial or military applications.

Badger Army Ammunition Plant occupies 7,354 acres in the predominantly rural countryside of Sauk County, Wisconsin.  Badger was constructed in 1942 following the nation’s entry into World War II.  The plant provided ammunition propellant for the duration of the war effort, and was again operative during the Korean and Vietnam Wars.  In late 1997 the U.S. Army determined that the Badger facility was no longer needed to meet the nation’s defense needs.  The entire property will be transferred to new owners to be conserved as a green space for agriculture, recreation, prairie restoration, and wildlife habitat.

For more information and to view the letter to EPA, visit www.cswab.org or call Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger at (608)643-3124.

* * *

Thomas V. Skinner, Regional Administrator
US EPA Region 5,
77 W. Jackson Blvd.
Chicago, IL 60604

March 22, 2004

Dear Administrator Skinner,

We are writing to collectively oppose open burning of PCBs at Badger Army Ammunition Plant – a proposal that will impact the health of so many and for generations to come.

The U.S. Army at Badger Army Ammunition Plant is seeking an exemption to a federal law that prohibits open burning of wastes containing more than 50 parts per million of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).  PCB concentrations in paint in certain buildings at Badger have been detected as high as 22,000 parts per million – more than 400 times the permissible limit set by the EPA.  If approved, this proposal will set a national precedent, opening the door for similar proposals in communities across the nation.

EPA set the 50 ppm limit for good reason.  Open burning results in the uncontrolled release of PCBs, dioxins, and other products of combustion to the environment including polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs).  These compounds are probable human carcinogens and their toxicity can be up to 100 times higher than the toxicity of some PCBs.

According to the Wisconsin Division of Health, the developing fetus, infants, and children are the population groups most vulnerable to PCB exposure.  While an adult may experience symptoms such as rash or acne as a result of PCB exposure, exposure of fetuses and children may impede the very development of their brains, reproductive, immune, and endocrine systems.

Emissions also threaten the ecological and cultural health of the Sauk Prairie which stretches across14,000 acres from the Wisconsin River to the Baraboo Range and nearby Devil’s Lake State Park.  The Badger property is home to nearly 600 species of plants, butterflies, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, aquatic species, and birds.  Grassland birds, in particular, have been able to thrive at the plant, making it one of the most critical habitat areas in the Midwest for this rapidly declining group.

Non-thermal technologies, including biological deactivation, mechanical demolition and disposal, hydroblasting, inerting, and many others, have been successfully implemented at military bases across the country.  There are viable solutions that will set a different precedent – one that ensures a safe and healthy future for our children and our environment.

Sincerely,

Laura Olah, Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger
Al Gedicks, Wisconsin Resources Protection Council
Alan Balkema, 20/20 Vision Milwaukee Area Project
Alice Hawley, North Freedom
Alice McCombs, EarthWINS
Amy Danzeisen, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Aimee Delach, Defenders of Wildlife
Anna Rondon, Dineh (Navajo), Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum
Anne Newhart, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Arlene & Hiroshi Kanno, Concerned Citizens of Newport
Barbara Morford, Hillpoint, Wisconsin
Barbara Morrison, Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin
Ben Manski, Green Party of the United States
Ben Paulo, Students for Leftist Action
Bill Ahrens, Mining Impact Coalition of Wisconsin
Bob Harrison, President, Badger Fly Fishers
Bob Reuschlin, Peace Economics
Brenda Baker, Director of Exhibits, Madison Children’s Museum
Brian Shore, UW-Greens
Brigid McDonald, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Bruce Barrett, MD, PhD, Madison Physicians for Social Responsibility
Carol Jahnkow, Peace Resource Center of San Diego
Carol Olyphant, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Christine Clemens, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Christine M. Meisenheimer, PhD, West Salem, Wisconsin
Christine Ziebold, MD PhD MPH
Colleen O’Malley, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Connie Kanitz, Fox Valley Peace Coalition
Craig Williams, Kentucky Environmental Foundation
Cynthia Stimmler, Dresser, Wisconsin
Daniel R. Patterson, Center for Biological Diversity
David Fallow, Madison, Wisconsin
David Hornemann, Madison, Wisconsin
Denny Caneff, River Alliance of Wisconsin
Diego Calderon, Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin
Donald M. Aucutt, Sauk City, Wisconsin
Don Timmerman and Roberta Thurstin, Northwoods Christian Mission
Donna Van Grinsven, Fox Valley Fellowship of Reconciliation
Donna Schmitz, Sauk City, Wisconsin
Dorothy Gosting, Wisconsin United Methodist Federation for Social Action
Douglas Morrison, Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin
Dr. Herbert J Bernstein, Institute for Science and Interdisciplinary Studies – ISIS
Dr. Herbert J Bernstein, Professor of Physics, Hampshire College, Visiting
Prof Physics UC Santa Barbara, Fellow of the APS, President of ISIS
Elizabeth Crowe, Chemical Weapons Working Group
Emily Green, Midwest Senior Regional Representative, Sierra Club
Edward McGlinn, Michigan
Fay & Marshall Stone, Platteville, Wisconsin
Frank Emspak, Professor, Department of Labor Education, University of Wisconsin Extension, Madison WI
Gaius Poehler, Minneapolis, Minnesota
George Rock, Wolf  River Chapter of Trout Unlimited
Ginny Bormann, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin
Glenda Bowling, Aberdeen Proving Ground Superfund Citizens Coalition
Gordon Anderson, Edina, Minnesota
Grace Potorti, Nevada Conservation League
Grant Abert, Hillpoint, Wisconsin
Greg Wingard, Waste Action Project
Guy Wolf, University of Wisconsin La Crosse Progressives
Guy Wolf, LaCrosse Coalition for Peace and Justice
Jackie Ward, Mother’s On the Move for Environmental Justice
Jan Conley, Lake Superior Greens
Jan Miyasaki, Madison, Wisconsin
Jane McDonald, Minneapolis, Minnesota
James “Sparky” Rodrigues, Malama Makua
James L. Mengel, Roseville, Minnesota
Jan Provost, Grandmothers for Peace-Northland
Jean M. Bahr, Madison, Wisconsin
Jenna Carlson, Sauk City, Wisconsin
Jennifer Giegerich, Wisconsin Public Interest Research Group – WISPIRG
Jerry Viste, Door County Environmental Council, Inc.
Joanne Robson, Winnebago Peace and Justice Center
Johanna Worley/Patricia Marquardt, Lake Shore Peacemakers
John Carlson, John Carlson Electric, LLC
John LaForge, Nukewatch
John Peck, Family Farm Defenders
John Marik, Stuart, Florida
John W. Henley, Sauk City, Wisconsin
Judy Miner, Wisconsin Network for Peace and Justice
Judy Weichman, St. Petersburg, Florida
June Crome, Interfaith Justice and Peace Committee
Kate McDonald, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Kate Wipperman, Madison, Wisconsin
Kathy F. Pielsticker, Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters
Kendall Lins, member, Badger Army Ammunition Plant Restoration Advisory Board
Laura Heinowski, Madison, Wisconsin
Laura Hunter, San Diego Environmental Health Coalition
Linda Caflisch, Sauk City, Wisconsin
Liz Wessel, Clean Wisconsin
Lois Marie Gibbs, Center for Health Environment and Justice
Lori Nitzel, Alliance for Animals

Margaret Lahti, Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin
Marie Kyle, La Crosse, Wisconsin
Mark F. Bohne, Co-Chairman, Plum Brook Ordnance Works Restoration Advisory Board
Mark DuRussel, Madison, Wisconsin
Marguerite Corcoran, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Mary Carol Solum, member, Badger Army Ammunition Plant Restoration Advisory Board
Marylia Kelley, Tri-Valley CAREs (Communities Against a Radioactive Environment)
Meagan Yost, Poynette, Wisconsin
Melissa and Bob Meyer, Madison, Wisconsin
Melissa Scanlan, Midwest Environmental Advocates
Melodie Dove, Friends of McKinley
Michael Crick, Community Co-Chair, Wurtsmith Air Force Base Restoration
Advisory Board, Michigan
Michael LaForest, Madison, Wisconsin
Mitzi and Peter Bowman, Don’t Waste Connecticut
Pamela K. Miller, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT)
Parin Shah, Community Toolbox for Children’s Environmental Health
Patricia Kelly, Baraboo, Wisconsin
Patricia A. Kimball, St. Petersburg, Florida (formerly Sauk City, Wisconsin)
Patricia Marquardt, Manitowoc, Wisconsin
Pat Conway, Coalition for Peaceful Skies
Paul Herr, Time Travel Geologic Tours
Katherine Fuchs, Peace Action Wisconsin
Peter Hille, Common Ground
Philip B. Leavenworth, Mount Horeb, Wisconsin
R. Tom Arbogast, Sauk Prairie Area Peace Council
Rachel Long, Downer Feminist Council
Ray & Hazel Bayley, Sauk Prairie
Rebecca Katers, Clean Water Action Council
Rev. Dave Steffenson, Ph.D., The Upstream Institute for Ecological Ethics
Richard Hill, Save the Valley
Richard Hugus, Alliance for Base Cleanup, Cape Cod
Rita McDonald, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Robert A. LoPinto, PE, Chairperson, Ft Totten RAB
Robert Rabin/Nilda Medina, Committee for the Rescue and Development of Vieques
Rose Marie Blazek, St. Paul, Minnesota
Sandra Conderm Mesa, Arizona
Sara Kerley, Durham Parents Against Lead
Sister Elaine Czarnezki, Sisters of the Divine Savior, Milwaukee
Stacy Larson, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Steve Clemens, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Steve Starkey, Wisconsin Community Fund
Steve Watrous, Political Action for a Clean Environment
Steve Watrous, Wisconsin Fair Trade Campaign
Susan Priebe, McFarland, Wisconsin
Tara Thornon, Military Toxics Project
Theresa O’Brien, St. Paul, Minnesota
Thomas Fusco, Brunswick Area Citizens for a Safe Environment (BACSE)
Tom H. Hastings, faculty, Conflict Resolution MA/MS, Portland State University
Tom Sullivan, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Vina Colley, Portsmouth/Piketon Residents for Environmental Safety and Security
Vina Colley, National Nuclear Workers for Justice
Virginia Bormann, East Bristol, Wisconsin
Vivian Hogie, North Freedom, Wisconsin
Wanda Colón Cortés, Proyecto Caribeño de Justicia y Paz, Puerto Rico
Warren Porter, Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Wendy Carlson, Sauk City, Wisconsin
Will Fantle, Northern Thunder
William George, West Salem, Wisconsin

Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger (CSWAB) is working to mobilize and empower rural communities near Wisconsin’s Badger Army Ammunition Plant in support of a sustainable future that will protect and restore the integrity of soil, water, air, and biological diversity.

For more information contact: CSWAB, E12629 Weigand’s Bay South, Merrimac, WI  53561 (608) 643-3124 or visit http://74.52.144.210/~cswab/safewater
More Groups Join Opposition to Burning
April 2005

The following have recently added their names to the growing list of organizations opposing the Army’s plan to open burn contaminated buildings:

ORGANIZATION   /  CONTACT PERSON

  1. 20/20 Vision Milwaukee Area Project   /  Alan Balkema
  2. Active Citizens for Truth   /  Ruby English
  3. Anathoth Community Farm  /   Mike Miles
  4. Basel Action Network /  Jim Puckett
  5. Casa Maria House of Hospitality / Kelly Lundeen
  6. Citizens for Global Solutions / Dr. Anthony Pavlik
  7. Coalition for Wisconsin Health / Rich Bogovich
  8. Columbia Support Network / Cecilia Zarate-Laun
  9. Cooperative Educational Service Agency #12  / Sue Anderson
  10. Dance Circus, Ltd / Betty Salamun
  11. Downer Feminist Council / Rachel Long
  12. Environmental Health Fund / Joseph DiGangi, PhD
  13. Evangelical Lutheran Church in America – Grtr Milw Synod / Buss Althoen
  14. First Congregational UCC for Peace and Justice Committee / Lavonne Solem
  15. Four Lakes Group Sierra Club / Lacinda Athen
  16. Fox Valley Fellowship of Reconciliation / Donna Van Grinsven
  17. Fox Valley Peace Coalition / Connie Kanitz
  18. Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives / Monica Wilson
  19. Grandmothers for Peace-Northland /Jan Provost
  20. Green Delaware / Alan Muller
  21. Hancock Center for Movement Art & Therapies, Inc. / Rena Kornblum
  22. Interfaith Justice & Peace Committee / June Kjome
  23. Interlake Friends Meeting / Donald R. Taylor
  24. International Depleted Uranium Study Team     / Damacio Lopez
  25. Justice, Peace & Integrity of Creation Committee of the Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi  / Irene Senn
  26. Kickapoo Peace Circle / Marcia Halligan
  27. LaCrosse Coalition for Peace & Justice / Guy Wolf
  28. Lake Shore Peacemakers / Johanna Worley and Patricia Marquardt
  29. Madeline Island Political Awareness / Holly M. Tourdot
  30. Madison Area Peace Coalition / Michael Wyatt
  31. Madison InfoShop / Jonathan Mertzig
  32. Midwest Renewable Energy Association  / Tehri Parker
  33. Milwaukee Faith Community for Worker Justice / Bill Morris
  34. Mining Impact Coalition of Wisconsin / Dave Blouin
  35. Mother Earth Foundation – Philippines / Sonia S. Mendoza
  36. National Youth & Student Peace Coalition / Jason Fults
  37. Non-incineration citizens, Japan / Setsuko Yamamoto
  38. Northwoods Christian Mission / Don Timmerman and Roberta Thurstin
  39. Northwoods Peace Fellowship / David Kast
  40. Northwest WI Rural Ministry / Curt Rohland
  41. Our Lives Count, Inc. / Debbie Roth
  42. Peaceseekers of Washington County / Brian Bunzel
  43. Peace Economics / Bob Reuschlein
  44. Peace and Justice Center – St. Norbert College / Sr. Sally Ann Brickner
  45. Peacemaking Association – The Milwaukee Peace Education Resource Center / Jacqueline Haessly
  46. Peacemaking Committee, Sisters of St. Francis of the Holy Cross / Maria Drzewiecki
  47. Pine Bluff for Safe Disposal / Evelyn Yates
  48. Political Action for a Clean Environment / Steve Watrous
  49. Press Connection Foundation / Nancy J. Emmert
  50. Racine Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse / Francie McGuire Winkler
  51. Rainbow Bookstore Cooperative / Marsh Rummel
  52. Right to Know Committee / Mable Mallard
  53. Rock Valley Fellowship of Reconciliation / Sue Nelson
  54. Saint Benedict Center / Mary Walgenbach
  55. Sauk Prairie Peace Council / R. Tom Arbogast
  56. Save Our Air Resources (S.O.A.R.)  / Linda G. Millerick
  57. Sisters of Saint Joseph – Social Justice Office / Sr. Dorothy Pagosa
  58. Social Justice Coalition – Coulee Region / Marilyn Levin
  59. South Central Federation of Labor / Jim Cavanaugh
  60. Southwest Workers’ Union / Genaro L. Rendon
  61. Students for Leftist Action / Ben Paulo
  62. TAPIT/new works / Donna Peckett and Danielle Dresden
  63. Tribal Environmental Watch Alliance / Gilbert Sanchez
  64. Veterans for Peace / Marion Stuenkel
  65. Veterans for Peace, Chapter 80 / Bradley Johnson
  66. Winnebago Peace and Justice Center / Joanne Robson
  67. Wisconsin Committee on Occupational Safety and Health / James Schultz
  68. Wisconsin Gray Panthers / Peggy Baime
  69. Wisconsin Manufactured Home Owners Association, Inc. / Kristen Zehner
  70. Wisconsin’s Nuclear WatchDog / Marion Stuenkel
  71. Wisconsin Partners for SustainAbility / Josie Pradella
  72. Wisconsin United Methodist Federation for Social Action / Dorothy Gosting

Video of Open Burning at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant

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